Feeds:
Posts

Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Article Title: Managing Altitude Sickness

Publication: Journey Beyond Travel

Summary: Trekking through the mountains into high altitudes is exhilarating, though such adventures also introduce the risk of altitude sickness. At worst, the condition can escalate from uncomfortable to fatal. Fortunately, recognizing and managing its effects can allow you to experience a safe and enjoyable journey. This article describes the symptoms of altitude sickness and suggests methods for managing it.

If altitude sickness strikes, the most effective remedy is to move down to a lower altitude and rest. Drink enough water to ensure that you’re sufficiently hydrated, and don’t climb back up the mountain until the symptoms are gone … even if it takes several hours. Noticing any symptoms early and responding immediately helps ensure a full recovery.

Click here to read the full article.

Read Full Post »

Article Title: eLearning and an Aging Workforce

Publication: Integrated Learnings: eLearning

Summary: Media outlets frequently analyze the implications of our aging workforce and remind us that a growing proportion is in their fifties and beyond. This article examines what instructional designers should do to accommodate this growing population from an eLearning perspective, based on the principles of learning theory and learning styles research.

A common theme in the literature addressing generations and learning preferences is that older generations tend to prefer a linear learning structure while younger generations prefer a more exploratory structure. Maybe this is true, maybe it’s not. Regardless, this is an area where instructional design principles can guide us.

Click here to read the full article.

Read Full Post »

Article Title: Online Learning, Memory, and Aging

Publication: InternetCE (insurance continuing education)

Summary: Many people start to notice decreased memory performance in their 50s. When experts talk about this, they’re generally referring to the ability to learn something new. This article describes the effects of aging on learning. The article also offers tips for learning from online training effectively, despite the effects of aging.

All of these activities prompt you to think critically about your newly learned knowledge and reframe it in a way that applies directly to your world. This strengthens the connection between new information and the knowledge you already have, which should make newly learned information easier to recall later.

Click here to read the full article.

Read Full Post »

Article Title: Foods that Boost Brain Power

Publication: InternetCE blog (insurance continuing education)

Summary: Eating a balanced diet is beneficial for the mind and body. If keeping your mental agility in tact is a priority, you should know about certain foods that are believed to be especially beneficial for brain functioning. This article lists a few of those foods and explains how they benefit the brain.

Berries. Oxygen is a critical element – without it, your brain would literally shut down. Berries are full of the nutrients needed to maintain oxygen levels in the brain. Blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries have a chemical that is used by the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for long-term memory. In animal studies, diets rich in blueberries improved motor skills and learning in aging rats. Wild blueberries are believed to be even more nutrient rich than what you typically buy in the store, which sounds like a good excuse for a weekend getaway for berry picking!

Click here to view the full article.


Read Full Post »

Article Title: 10 Factors that Affect Learning

Publication: InternetCE blog (insurance continuing education)

Summary: From lifestyle to momentary circumstance, many types of factors affect our ability to learn new information. Not all are easy to control; however, knowing what what those factors are can help you get the most out of a course or other learning experience. This article explains ten factors that affect learning and offers advice on how to positively influence each.

Take frequent breaks. With a busy schedule, it can be tempting to plow through an online course as quickly as possible. But if you’re skimming the content and clicking ahead quickly, how much can you really expect to remember later? If you genuinely want to learn, slow down your pace and take frequent breaks. The breaks allow time to process segments of new information and help keep you attentive.

Click here to view the full article.


Read Full Post »

Article Title: Exercise and Learn More

Publication: InternetCE blog (insurance continuing education)

Summary: Most people know that they should exercise regularly, and most can probably rattle off at least a dozen reasons why. Interestingly, improved memory is a compelling reason that many might not think of. This article explains how daily exercise benefits learning and memory, offering evidence to support the oft touted statement, “What’s good for the heart is good for the brain.” It also suggests ways to work small amounts of light exercise into a busy schedule.

When your brain is low on oxygen, it can be difficult to focus. Naturally, if you’re not attentive during an online course, you’re less likely to recall new information later. However, even small amounts of light exercise daily can be enough to boost your brain’s oxygen levels.

Click here to view the full article.


Read Full Post »

Article Title: Take a Course…Then Take a Nap

Publication: InternetCE blog (insurance continuing education)

Summary: As kids, we resisted naps. As adults, we wish we could do it more often. As it turns out, napping might actually be good for professional development. This article summarizes two studies that suggest that napping can improve our ability to learn.

The researchers theorize that the memory consolidation that takes place during sleep not only solidifies newly learned information in long-term memory, but also clears some space in short-term memory for new information.

Click here to read the full article.

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 754 other followers